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Author Neal StephensonAmerican writer Neal Stephenson was born October 31, 1959 in Maryland. He came from a family of engineers and scientists. Stephenson studied at Boston University, first specializing in physics, then switching to geography after he found that it would allow him to spend more time on the university mainframe. He graduated in 1981 with a B.A. in geography and a minor in physics.

Stephenson is best known for his works of speculative fiction. His work explores subjects such as mathematics, cryptography, philosophy, currency, and the history of science. He also writes non-fiction articles about technology in publications such as Wired.

Stephenson has lived mostly in the Pacific Northwest and currently resides in Seattle with his family

Neal Stephenson Book List and Awards
His website: www.nealstephenson.com
Similar authors: William Gibson, Dan Simmons, Bruce Sterling
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Seveneves
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Seveneves by Neal Stephenson
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Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., The | Stephenson, Neal | Signed First Edition Book Stephenson, Neal and Galland, Nicole | Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., The | Double Signed First Edition Copy

Author Signed Hardcover Book. June 2017 NY: William Morrow First edition, first printing, mint, new/unread in a flawless dust jacket, signed by both authors. Each dust jacket is protected in an acid-free archival quality acetate cover.

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Neal Stephenson Bibliography


Novels
  • The Big U (1984)
  • Zodiac (1988)
  • Snow Crash (1992)
  • Interface (1994) with J. Frederick George, as "Stephen Bury"
  • The Diamond Age: or A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer (1995)
  • The Cobweb (1996) with J. Frederick George, as "Stephen Bury"
  • Cryptonomicon (1999)
  • Quicksilver (2003), volume I: The Baroque Cycle
  • The Confusion (2004), volume II: The Baroque Cycle
  • The System of the World (2004), volume III: The Baroque Cycle
  • Anathem (2008)
  • The Mongoliad (20102012)
  • Reamde (2011)
  • Seveneves (2015)

Short Fiction
  • "Spew" (1994), in Hackers (1996)
  • "The Great Simoleon Caper" (1995), TIME
  • "Excerpt from the Third and Last Volume of Tribes of the Pacific Northwest" in Full Spectrum 5 (1995)
  • "Jipi and the Paranoid Chip" (1997), Forbes
  • "Crunch" (1997), in Disco 2000 (edited by Sarah Champion, 1998) ("Crunch" is a chapter from Cryptonomicon)

Other Fiction Projects
  • Project Hieroglyph, founded in 2011, administered by Arizona State University's Center for Science and the Imagination since 2012. Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, ed. Ed Finn and Kathryn Cramer, which includes contributions by Stephenson

Non-Fiction
  • "Smiley's people". 1993.
  • "In the Kingdom of Mao Bell". Wired. 1994. "A billion Chinese are using new technology to create the fastest growing economy on the planet. But while the information wants to be free, do they?"
  • "Mother Earth Mother Board". Wired. 1996. "In which the Hacker Tourist ventures forth across three continents, telling the story of the business and technology of undersea fiber-optic cables, as well as an account of the laying of the longest wire on Earth."
  • "Global Neighborhood Watch". Wired. 1998. Stopping street crime in the global village.
  • In the Beginning... Was the Command Line.
  • "Communication Prosthetics: Threat, or Menace?". Whole Earth Review, Summer 2001.
  • "Turn On, Tune In, Veg Out". Op-Ed piece on Star Wars, in The New York Times, June 17, 2005.
  • "It's All Geek To Me". Op-Ed piece on the film 300 and geek culture, The New York Times, March 18, 2007.
  • "Atoms of Cognition: Metaphysics in the Royal Society 17152010," chapter in Seeing Further: The Story of Science and the Royal Society, edited by Bill Bryson. Stephenson discusses the legacy of the rivalry between Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz, November 2, 2010.
  • "Space Stasis". Slate. February 2, 2011. "What the strange persistence of rockets can teach us about innovation."
  • "Innovation Starvation". World Policy Journal, 2011.
  • Some Remarks: Essays and Other Writing.

Neal Stephenson Awards
  • The Diamond Age: or A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer (1995) Hugo and Locus SF Awards winner, 1996
  • Cryptonomicon (1999) Locus SF Award winner, 2000 and Prometheus Hall of Fame Award 2013
  • Quicksilver (2003), volume I: The Baroque Cycle Clarke Award winner, 2004
  • The Confusion (2004), volume II: The Baroque Cycle and winner 2005 Locus SF Award
  • The System of the World (2004), volume III: The Baroque Cycle Locus SF Award winner, 2005; Prometheus Award winner, 2005
  • Anathem (2008) Locus SF Award winner, 2009

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